Pythons Blamed For Everglade’s Disappearing Animals

The Florida Everglades is infested with Burmese pythons. To keep them from spreading, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is making it illegal to import the pythons into the country, or transport them across state lines. Scientists have discovered the pythons are doing more damage than ever imagined.

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Invasive Pythons Put Squeeze On Everglades’ Animals

Burmese pythons have been slithering around south Florida for decades, but scientists now say the invasive constrictors are so bad, they’re eating their way through the swamps. The snakes have decimated populations of mammals like raccoons, possums and white-tailed deer.

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FDA Agrees To Limit Antibiotics In Livestock

The FDA is increasing regulations on a class of antibiotic drugs commonly used by livestock producers. The drugs are great for treating infections in animals and humans. Food safety advocates say the over-use of cephalosporin in animals has contributed to the development of diseases that tolerate the antibiotic.

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Zoo Crafts Love Nest To Save Ozark’s Salamanders

The large, flat, slimy, river-dwelling hellbenders are among the world’s largest salamanders — and they’re quickly disappearing. But thanks to a new conservation program and a high-tech ecosystem at the Saint Louis Zoo, scientists say 2012 could be a year of resurgence for the animals.

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Zoo Crafts Love Nest To Save Ozark’s Salamanders

The large, flat, slimy, river-dwelling hellbenders are among the world’s largest salamanders — and they’re quickly disappearing. But thanks to a new conservation program and a high-tech ecosystem at the Saint Louis Zoo, scientists say 2012 could be a year of resurgence for the animals.

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Biotech Firms Caught In Regulatory No Man’s Land

Companies making genetically modified animals face a regulatory morass in this country. It’s not always clear which federal agency has responsibility for regulating a particular animal, and even when one agency does take the lead, the approval process can drag on for years.

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Myth Busting: The Truth About Animals And Tools

Birds and wasps do it. So do octopuses, otters, polar bears and dolphins. A surprising number of animals use tools, and scientists say there are some widespread misconceptions. Among them: Using tools isn’t a sign of intelligence, and animals don’t need fingers to be crafty with tools.

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Along With Humans, Who Else Is In The 7 Billion Club?

There are now 7 billion people, according to the U.N.’s population division. That prompts a question: Who else is in the 7 Billion Club? To learn which other animals had reached that plateau, we asked wildlife experts — who said it’s a tough call.

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Inside Namibia’s Rural Communal Conservancies

The southwest African country of Namibia is trying a controversial approach to preserving its wildlife. Rural people control the animals and profit from them. But they have also found they must shoot some of the animals to cull the herds.

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Don’t Go Near That Guy With A Rifle! What Guy?

Attention all deer! As hunting season approaches, please be aware that the guy who’s about to shoot you may be invisible. Just as some animals try to blend into their environments, so do people and machines (even warships!) — but we do it with the help of high-tech camouflage technology.

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Managing Forests To Manage Wildfires

Record breaking fires in the Southwest have burned thousands of acres, disrupting people and animals, and leaving muddy, flood-prone landscapes in their wake. Ira Flatow and guests discuss fire ecology, and how new forest management strategies may help stifle the blazes.

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An Ice Age Beast Evolved To Beat The Cold

The recent discovery of a woolly rhino skull on the Tibetan Plateau suggests that the rhino was one of the few animals that was prepared for the Ice Age when it came along. Scientists wonder which isolated places on Earth today will be the cradle of evolution for the next big environmental change.

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An Ice Age Beast Evolved To Beat The Cold

The recent discovery of a woolly rhino skull on the Tibetan Plateau suggests that the rhino was one of the few animals that was prepared for the Ice Age when it came along. Scientists wonder which isolated places on Earth today will be the cradle of evolution for the next big environmental change.

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How Bloodsucking Vampire Bats Aim Their Bites

Vampire bats need to get about 2 tablespoons of blood a day to live. To find it, the animals are able to detect heat — and where there’s heat, there are blood vessels close to the surface. Researchers say they have identified the molecular basis for this remote sensing ability.

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Teaching A Chimp To Speak In ‘Project Nim’

Are humans the only animals capable of using language? A controversial scientific experiment in the 1970s attempted to answer that question. A new documentary looks at the scientists behind that experiment, who raised a chimp as a human and tried to teach him sign language. Jenny Lee and Bob Ingersoll, both interviewed in the film, and Science Magazine’s Jon Cohen discuss the ethics of “Project Nim.”

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