How State Associations Can Eliminate ‘Plaintiff Shills’ In Malpractice Cases

One of the most overlooked components of malpractice is the role of the expert witness. I have written about this in a previous blog, “Should Courtrooms Bar ‘Hired Guns’ As Expert Witnesses in Malpractice Cases?” (see http://tinyurl.com/7st2zlj).

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Why I Made The Decision To Specialize In Wound Care

Welcome to my new blog. I am honored to share information, insights and ideas with my colleagues. It is my hope that by sharing my experiences with the readers of Podiatry Today, you will be encouraged and inspired in your efforts when treating patients affected with wounds of varying etiologies.

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A New Review Of Antibiotic Therapy For Osteomyelitis

I wish all of my readers a healthy, happy and prosperous 2012. With this post, I am trying something a bit different. In the past, I usually waited to put up a post until I come up with an “aha” moment on something I have seen, heard or read about, and then pontificate on this site. These moments could occur only days apart but usually it was a much longer time period leading to relatively infrequent additions to the blog.

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Blog Readers Argue About Board Certification: Is It Fair Or Another Way To Discriminate?

When I think about subjects that cause controversy, my last blog topic, “Making Interprofessional Education a Priority to Improve Podiatric Parity,” (http://tinyurl.com/cuefzz5 ) would not be at the top of my list. However, for some readers, it met the qualifications for controversy and they started a verbal parry over what I had said.

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Why Recommending Barefoot Running As An Alternative For Injured Runners Can Be A Reckless Proposition

I recently blogged about minimalist shoes and injuries (see http://tinyurl.com/73qpd6x ). Dana Webb, DPM, commented on the blog, emphasizing the contention that effective minimalist running is all about technique. Here is the comment from Dr. Webb and my subsequent response.

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What Happened To Continuing Education For Podiatric Biomechanics?

While doing background research for this blog, I originally intended to focus on the reasons why topics relating to biomechanics have vanished from presentations at major podiatric conferences around the country. I wanted to review the lecture schedules from last year as well as upcoming meetings in 2012 to make sure that I was correct regarding the dearth of biomechanics lectures.

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So What Is The Salt?

The Salt is a blog is about what we eat and why we eat it. It’s about how food opens doors for discussion all over the world, and how it shapes the world, from culture, to science, to history, to business practices and environmental impacts.

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Addressing Subsequent Gait Issues In A Child Who Had An Intracranial Ventricular Shunt And Hydrocephalus In Utero

As I mentioned in an earlier blog (see http://bit.ly/otq05C ), I recently visited family in Canada and, of course, served as a personal podiatric physician to my parents’ and in-laws’ relatives, friends and neighbors. As our family knows, my big interest lies in pediatric foot and ankle deformities. With this in mind, my mother-in-law asked me to meet with a next-door neighbor‘s child, whom she described as “interesting.” For once (wink wink), my mother-in-law was right.
 

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My Search For A New Associate

I have just completed a six-month search for a new associate to join my practice. This process has been an eye-opening experience in revealing the problems we have created in preparing residents for a career in podiatric medicine.

I just read the new blog (see http://bit.ly/nTcUGF ) by Christopher Hyer, DPM, FACFAS, and could not agree more with his observations that underscore my own recent experience. It appears that today’s post-graduate podiatric residency programs are training individuals for a sub-specialty that has little demand or opportunity in the real world.

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The Importance Of Being Earnest With Your Hand Hygiene

For my inaugural blog, I wanted to touch on a subject that is so common for each of us in our clinical practice that it perhaps does not get the appropriate attention it deserves: hand hygiene.

While this may seem rudimentary, recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) demonstrate that healthcare workers are among some of the greatest offenders when it comes to effectively and consistently washing their hands.1

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Why Is Podiatry Trying To Reinvent The Wheel?

I am honored to contribute a monthly blog for Podiatry Today and have given my first topic much consideration. What should I write about? Should I discuss an interesting case presentation? Should I offer pearls for a complex reconstructive surgery? As I contemplate these possibilities, I am drawn to a potentially “hot potato” political topic, which I feel is vitally important to discuss.

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How Have Patients Responded To The Suture And Button Stabilization Technique?

I am happy to report that my patients and I have been pleased with the results of the suture and button stabilization technique used for stabilizing plantar plate insufficiency associated with lesser metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) instability. (See the February 2011 Podiatry Today cover story at http://www.podiatrytoday.com/current-insights-treating-second-mpj-dysfun… and a previous blog I did on this subject at http://www.podiatrytoday.com/blogged/questions-and-answers-suture-and-bu… .)

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Dead Men Do Tell Tales: When Neglecting Family History Leads To A PE-Related Fatality And Malpractice Lawsuit

Anyone who has visited the Disney Pirates of the Caribbean ride has heard the entertaining recital of the phrase “Dead men tell no tales.” Unfortunately, in the real world, dead men can leave behind quite a tale, often in the mode of a malpractice suit.

The following case settles this month and illustrates a problem that I had discussed in an earlier blog (http://www.podiatrytoday.com/blogged/why-a-post-op-fatality-is-a-wake-up… ). Different case, same problem.

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Her Ticket To Space: $20 Million

Tell Me More’s series “Flying High: First In Their Class” looks back on some of the famous firsts in space. In this final installment, host Michel Martin speaks with Anousheh Ansari, the first woman to pay for a voyage to space, the first Iranian American to travel into space and first person to blog from the International Space Station.

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How Can DPMs Prevent Falls In The Elderly?

Later this month, I will have the privilege to present two lectures at the Annual Meeting of the American Podiatric Medical Association in Boston (see http://members.apma.org/Members/Events/TheNational.aspx ). My first lecture will cover the controversies of preventive ankle bracing. I have previously discussed this topic on my blog (see http://www.podiatrytoday.com/blogged/what-evidence-reveals-about-prophyl… ).

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