Imagining A More Active Moon

The standard picture of the moon is of a long-dead object, geologically speaking. But using observations from cameras on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Thomas Watters and colleagues say in the journal Nature Geosciencesthat there are signs of more recent tectonic activity on the moon, within the last 50 million years.

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Is A Wound Care Specialist The Best Answer For Your Patients With Wounds?

One of the truly great aspects of our profession is that in podiatric medicine, we can offer our services through a wide range of areas. Whether as a provider to our patients or as a consultant to colleagues from other disciplines, a podiatric physician’s value is limitless. This is especially true when one considers the infinite good that we are capable of bringing to the medical community.

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Will U.S. Amputation Rates Continue To Fall In People With Diabetes?

There may be some good news in regard to amputation rates in patients with diabetes in the United States.

A recent study in Diabetes Care found that nontraumatic lower extremity amputation rates have decreased in patients with diabetes over age 40.1 Lin and colleagues found the amputation discharge rate per 1,000 people with diabetes was 3.9 in 2008 — down from 11.2 in 1996.

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Why I Made The Decision To Specialize In Wound Care

Welcome to my new blog. I am honored to share information, insights and ideas with my colleagues. It is my hope that by sharing my experiences with the readers of Podiatry Today, you will be encouraged and inspired in your efforts when treating patients affected with wounds of varying etiologies.

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How To Find Balance In Your Practice And Life

Do you have balance in your professional career and personal life? I am not sure I do. From my discussion with other colleagues, I believe most of you do not either.

One of the reasons I became a podiatrist was to have a “normal” lifestyle but that has never seemed to materialize. I have always had a good work ethic but why does a good work ethic still seem to create an unbalanced life? As we start a new year and I enter my 21st year of practice, I am going to strive to find better balance in my life. I hope this provokes you to consider the balance in your life.

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Levitating Fruit Flies To Learn About Space Travel

Physicist Richard Hill and colleagues at the University of Nottingham have a powerful magnet that they have used to levitate fruits, beer and most recently, fruit flies. It’s a low-cost way to study the effects of zero gravity on biological systems, Hill says.

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A Pigeon’s Potential: Learning Abstract Numbers

Damian Scarf at New Zealand’s University of Otago reports in the current issue of the journal Science that experiments he conducted with colleagues show that pigeons can learn abstract rules about numbers.

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What Makes Wings Work?

Researchers at New York University are studying flight with a speaker, a soup pot, straws and a box full of paper aircraft. Emeritus professor Stephen Childress describes the experiment and what he and his colleagues have learned about flight from their homemade flying objects.

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Do Dilemmas Over DVT Prophylaxis Keep You Up At Night?

As physicians, we try to do everything in our powers to heal and improve our patients’ quality of life. Medicine and surgery are part science/part art and some problems have no definitive answers.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis and foot and ankle surgery is one of my top clinical dilemmas and one I actively discuss with colleagues, fellows and residents. I would love to hear the online community’s thoughts as well.

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Navigating Parental Minefields When Treating Kids

As many of you know, I love working with kids. There is something about treating that population that I feel makes all the hard work in school and residency worth it. However, it does take a special kind of person to know how to deal with the challenges of this population. In the last couple of weeks, I was reminded why some of my colleagues just outright avoid this age group altogether.

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Flight Of The Wild Pigeon

Pigeons may not be known for their flying prowess, but they are actually pretty good at maneuvering right angles. Andrew Biewener and colleagues at Harvard’s Concord Field Station caught pigeons in a parking garage, made a flying course in the lab and filmed the birds with high speed cameras to see how pigeons make tight turns.

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‘Steve Jobs’: Profiling An Ingenious Perfectionist

For years, Steve Jobs courted biographer Walter Isaacson to write the definitive story of his life. When Isaacson learned how sick Jobs really was, he accepted. Here he discusses profiling the tech visionary, a task that often involved reconciling Jobs’ recollections with those of his friends, family and colleagues.

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Using DNA To Shape Nanostructures

Chemists and materials scientists are trying to learn to build ultra-small, precisely ordered structures for use in optics, electronics, and other applications. Writing in the journal Science, Chad Mirkin and colleagues describe a way to use snippets of DNA to tailor the shape and size of crystal structures, tweaking them to fit specific uses.

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What A Lecture Trip To England Revealed About The Country’s National Healthcare System

During my recent trip to England, I participated as a faculty member at two podiatry and physiotherapy meetings. This was my third trip to the country in the past five years, giving me the opportunity to lecture and interact with colleagues. My experiences this time ran the gamut from dismay about the healthcare system in the United Kingdom to awe and respect for the level of care many of our colleagues offer in this country.

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Where Do Those Patients Go Once We Lose Them To Follow-Up?

At a recent teaching conference I attended, after all of the formal lecturing was over, my colleagues and I made a real discovery about where patients go when they disappear from your practice and why. Haven’t you always wondered?

That day, we were discussing the topic of Morton’s neuroma and the best treatment protocols.

Do you perform alcohol sclerosing of the nerve, thereby killing the nerve?

Do you decompress the nerve, thereby freeing it to recover (hopefully)?

Do you inject cortisone in the hopes of calming the nerve, allowing it to become less inflamed temporarily?

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Mining the Disabled List for Insight Into Baseball Injuries

Baseball is known for its love of statistics. Writing in the American Journal of Sports Medicine, Brett Owens and colleagues examine 7 years worth of injury records for Major League Baseball and find that pitchers are more likely to be injured than fielders, that pitchers are more likely to be injured before the All Star Game than later in the season, and that there has been a significant increase in player injuries since 2005.

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