Weaving Around Web Privacy Controls

Web browser manufactures often market their products to consumers with an emphasis on privacy, assuring users that their products can better control how personal information is used online. Carnegie Mellon privacy researcher Lorrie Cranor explains that many companies have developed quiet ways to step around some of that privacy-protecting code.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Researcher Decodes Workplace Rank From Emails

Eric Gilbert, an assistant professor at Georgia Tech, tells Audie Cornish about his latest study on work emails. He looked at how certain words or phrases used in work correspondence can reveal if the message is being sent by someone higher up or further below you on the corporate food chain.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Deconstructing Dengue: How Old Is That Mosquito?

Dengue fever, a nasty disease caused by a virus, is just beginning to show up in the U.S. It’s carried from person to person by mosquitoes, and one researcher studying the spread is looking for clues in the age of the insects. But it’s not very easy to tell how old a mosquito is.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

20 Million Years Later, Russians Work To Drill Into Lake

Russian researchers in Antarctica are on the verge of piercing a hole through two miles of ice into an ancient lake, untouched by the light of day for some 20 million years. But it’ll be a delicate process to break through without disturbing the pristine waters. Guest host David Green speaks with Antarctic researcher John Priscu about the process.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

‘I Wanted To Live:’ New Depression Drugs Offer Hope For Toughest Cases

The anesthetic and club drug ketamine seems to lift depression symptoms in a matter of hours. But how does it work? Researchers are searching for the answer in an attempt to make a new class of depression medications. “We can take care of a migraine in hours,” one researcher asks. “So why do we have to wait weeks or months with depression?”

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

‘I Wanted To Live’: New Depression Drugs Offer Hope For Toughest Cases

The anesthetic and club drug ketamine seems to lift depression symptoms in a matter of hours. But how does it work? Researchers are searching for the answer in an attempt to make a new class of depression medications. “We can take care of a migraine in hours,” one researcher asks. “So why do we have to wait weeks or months with depression?”

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Ode To Ice

Discover the secret life of ice–what makes it cloudy or clear, why cracks form on ponds. Science Friday visited Queens ice sculptor Shintaro Okamoto in his studio and spoke with ice researcher Erland Schulson, of Dartmouth University, to find out why ice is an interesting subject for artists and scientists.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

UConn Claims Resveratrol Researcher Falsified Work

After a three-year investigation, the University of Connecticut Health Center has told 11 scientific journals that studies they published by resveratrol researcher Dipak K. Das may not be trustworthy.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Researcher Discusses Ohio Fracking, Earthquakes

Melissa Block interviews John Armbruster, a seismologist with Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, part of Columbia University, about why he believes the waste from fracking in Ohio has led to the earthquakes there. He says the injection of waste water from the fracking process created pressure on nearby faults, and he expects the quakes to continue — even after the process is stopped.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

A Researcher Asks: Are Dolphins Self-Aware?

Like chimpanzees, dolphins are large-brained and highly social animals, but can they recognize themselves in a mirror? Psychologist and dolphin researcher Diana Reiss discusses her work with dolphin communication and cognition.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Medal Recipient Champions Diversity In Mathematics

Rice University mathematician and researcher Richard Tapia is among seven recipients of the nation’s highest honor in science, the National Medal of Science. Tapia, the son of Mexican immigrants, has been a longtime champion of diversity in education. He speaks with NPR’s Michel Martin about winning the award, and his family.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Polar Bear Researcher To Be Re-Interviewed By Feds

Federal officials continue to probe allegations of misconduct related to a famous report on dead polar bears that raised concerns about climate change. Later this month, officials plan to re-interview one of the two government scientists who wrote that report.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Study: Women’s Memory More Receptive To Low Voice

Melissa Block and Lynn Neary learn from researcher Kevin Allan of the University of Aberdeen King’s College in Scotland that women remember better when spoken to in a low-pitch voice. This helps women to pick a suitable partner.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Polar Bear Scientist Was Accused By Federal Worker

The controversial “polarbeargate” investigation into Arctic researcher Charles Monnett originated when allegations of scientific misconduct were made by a “seasoned, career Department of the Interior” employee. Until now, what sparked the investigation had been a mystery.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Solar-Charged Phones Without A 93-Million-Mile Cord

Researchers have found a way for LCD screens to charge using solar power, indoor light and the devices’ own backlight. That means in a few years, you may be able to recharge your phone by pointing it toward the sun instead of plugging it into the wall. Guest host John Ydstie talks to the lead UCLA researcher, Yang Yang.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Improv For Alzheimer’s: ‘A Sense Of Accomplishment’

Researchers in Chicago have paired up with a local theater group to see how improvisational theater games affect the health and mood of patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. “Improv is all about being in the moment, which for someone with memory loss, that is a very safe place,” says one researcher.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

Improv For Alzheimer’s: ‘A Sense Of Accomplishment’

Researchers in Chicago have paired up with a local theater group to see how improvisational theater games affect the health and mood of patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. “Improv is all about being in the moment, which for someone with memory loss, that is a very safe place,” says one researcher.

» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us